Contributors look back on their time at Yewth

After the announcement of Yewth ceasing operations last week, we spoke with editors, writers and photographers to find out how they became involved, their favourite moments and what they're up to next. 

Haneen Martin - Online Arts Editor

 Haneen Martin set up at ACE Open. Photo by Sia Duff.

Haneen Martin set up at ACE Open. Photo by Sia Duff.

After admiring Yewth from afar, I realised there was scope to expand and join forces by trying to mix up the voices and the stories being put out into the world. It was also really significant for me to be able to jump in not only as a woman in media, but as a woman of colour focusing on and editing a whole heap of visual arts and culture content.

There are so many highlights, but the stand out forever will be getting a message out of the blue from one of the contributors I had mentored and edited, thanking me for my time because they had been able to receive paid work as an arts writer.

The timing of Yewth ending is eerily perfect for me, as I have recently left Adelaide for sunny Darwin where I am able to focus on learning more about various cultures, writing and making art. I have already had the chance to write for The AU Review and will keep on trying to inject that DIY Zombie Queen energy everywhere I go. Adelaide, I haven't forgotten you! Always send an email if you need something plugged on Zombie Queen socials. Follow @zombiequeen_sant and @femineenzi.


Liam Bosecke - Writer

 Liam Bosecke at SMOCK. Photo by Dave Court.

Liam Bosecke at SMOCK. Photo by Dave Court.

I first became aware of Yewth when Henry Jock Walker was writing a piece about my brother's (Kurt Bosecke's) exhibition 'Beastie Boy' at Created Range for Issue 008.
 
After that, I was inspired by the community spirit that was shown through the publication, and how that interaction and involvement can generate growth and positivity among others and through myself.
 
Writing for Yewth really forced me out of my comfort zone. I didn't really know anybody that worked there well. But the opportunity has allowed me to make some really amazing friends and opened a lot of doors for me personally within the art community.
 
It's too hard to pinpoint exactly one moment that really highlighted my time. I would have to say the experience as a whole has really helped me grow as an individual; conversing with people who I wouldn't have met otherwise and attending amazing exhibitions which I would have been ignorant towards otherwise. It's been a real eye-opener into how amazing the arts community is here in Adelaide and has really helped me grow in confidence.  
 
Right now, I'm working on a couple of SALA Festival shows that will be exhibiting in August. I hope to further my own artistic practice and develop an innovative workflow with my 3D artwork.
You can find out more at @liambosecke.
 


Wade Whitington - Photographer

 Wade Whitington at home in the photo pit. Photo by John Goodridge.

Wade Whitington at home in the photo pit. Photo by John Goodridge.

I became involved when I abandoned ship at another publication because I saw fair work and people that actually loved me for who I was at Yewth! Working and partying with the (then young) team of legends seemed like a great time so I talked to Caleb about joining the team.
 
My favourite part of shooting for Yewth was the very few occasions where we would all have time off and be able to celebrate after an event. Was a good time.
 
Currently, I’m a freelance photographer and trying to take over Adelaide, so if you are interested, hit me up at @wadewhitington on Instagram.


Freya Langley - Online Editor

 Freya Langley (right) with Haneen Martin at Ancient World. Photo by Renew Adelaide.

Freya Langley (right) with Haneen Martin at Ancient World. Photo by Renew Adelaide.

I joined the Yewth team in late 2015 when Patrick asked if I’d review a West Thebarton gig at Ancient World. I jumped on board as Yewth’s saltiest editor for Issue 8 and hung around to edit online content there after. 

Highlights? Interviewing Camp Cope for Issue 8 is up there, as was chatting with Gemma of The Mary Lee Exchange. Anything where I’ve been able to write about women-led projects/bands etc. 

Anything I’ve written for print has been really special as well. There’s something really exciting about seeing your name in thousands of copies of a magazine. This is so different to seeing your name online - you can hold your work in your hands and feel the paper (I always like to smell the magazine when it’s hot off the press too - fresh ink and untouched paper).

I’ve loved helping emerging musicians get their music and videos out into the world as well and showing people all of the incredible things being made in Adelaide. I’ve met so many hardworking and talented creatives working (some of whom have become good friends) to foster a unique and diverse local culture in a city that is so often overlooked.

In the same way we talk about paying musicians, photographers, graphic designers and artists for their time and craft - pay your writers, support local media. Yewth has helped to shape a new wave of young South Australians who are passionate about their city. We need people like us, like CityMag and like Three D Radio, to keep this culture of youth-driven live music, arts and culture alive. 

What’s next? Finishing my degree(s), travel, maybe a 'real job' and finally being able to return to listening to The Smiths/hot mess’ demo almost exclusively.  Stay tuned via LinkedIn.

Matthew Hayward - Writer

 Matthew Hayward (left) at the launch of Issue 8. Photo by Wade Whitington.

Matthew Hayward (left) at the launch of Issue 8. Photo by Wade Whitington.

I saw an opportunity to write for an exciting publication and I took it. I had met Courtney and Caleb separately through One & Three and Yewth and jumped at the chance to be part of something that was missing in the Adelaide arts/culture scene.
 
My highlight was profiling three of the most promising up-and-coming musical acts from South Australia: DyspOra & Playback 808, West Thebarton and Abbey Howlett. I have to give particular reference to Gabriel Akon (DyspOra & Playback 808) a guy so talented and inspiring that it made me grow as a person, too. That was exciting. Working for Music SA I also loved all of our working meetings and the left of field ideas being floated around.
 
I’m currently travelling on a bit of an extended sojourn at the moment. Currently in Williamsburg, NY (having done Canadian Music Week in Toronto) I’m about to land in Reykjavík, Iceland in June. I’m going to keep being involved in local music and promoting the hell out of what we have to offer. You can find me @prayersonfireadel – I’m sure I’ll be back in little old Adelaide sooner rather than later.


Georgia Matthews - Photographer

 Georgia Matthews in her element at WOMADelaide. Photo by WOMAD.

Georgia Matthews in her element at WOMADelaide. Photo by WOMAD.

I became a photographer for Yewth after applying to be a "contributor" in late 2016 (advertised on Facebook). I wanted to be more active in covering Adelaide events and media
 
Highlights included working for major events in South Australia such as WOMAD and Blenheim, but also covering major music festivals interstate such as BIGSOUND (QLD). Having my images exposed like this was honestly a dream come true. Yewth provided opportunities for me to cover and shoot events in Adelaide such as Vera Blue, Montaigne and The Belligerents, who also posted and shared my images on their Instagram. As well as producers and festival/band managers contacting me for extra work because of my exposure with Yewth.
 
I hope to keep photographing and providing fresh insight into music, art and media across Australia. Follow me at @gm_photography___.


Paul Maland - Online Editor

 Paul Maland (left) at the launch of Issue 7. Photo by Danny Howe.

Paul Maland (left) at the launch of Issue 7. Photo by Danny Howe.

I become involved with Yewth from Courtney and Lewis’ One & Three blog, way back in 2015. I'd just started a journalism degree and wanted to get some hands-on experience writing and covering something I love (live music), so I jumped in.
 
Really hard to pick just one highlight; I got some really great opportunities across all my positions with Yewth. I'm really proud of the review I wrote for A Day of Clarity 2016, and covering the move of the Rhino Room in print Issue 8. I also got to interview the mayor of Adelaide, triple j meme-tier bands like Dune Rats, Skeggs, and Polish Club... but ultimately nothing comes close to the feeling you get from your first review and byline. Getting a free ticket to a band you like, and then somehow getting asked to write what you thought about it and seeing your name up and published afterwards is just the best.
 
I'm going a bit harder on video than anything else this year. I've even embraced the cringe and launched a YouTube channel! @PaulMalandTV on Instagram and Facebook, and Youtube.com/PaulMalandTV for the channel.
 


Isaac Selby - Writer

 Isaac Selby (left) at Adelaide Reclink Community Cup 2017. Photo by Dave Court.

Isaac Selby (left) at Adelaide Reclink Community Cup 2017. Photo by Dave Court.

I started off doing a couple of interviews for One & Three back in the day before the big merger. I then responded to a callout for writers and have been trying to put out content when I've had spare time since.
 
The singular highlight for me was probably reviewing Laneway Festival this year. Getting to go to an event that I really love and getting to write about it was really great.
 
As a whole though my highlight has probably been gradually gaining confidence in my ability to cover a wider range of stories and writing styles from features to reviews, interviews etc. Before Yewth I'd only ever really written for school assignments so to be writing something knowing that other people actually read has been really sweet.
 
I'm going to continue working towards a career in broadcasting for now while pumping out as many bad jokes on the internet as possible. If you haven't already, be sure to follow Shit Sports Memes, 5 Star it'll ruin your day.


Thank you to these contributors and many more who worked on the Yewth team over the past four years. Join us to celebrate this Friday at RIP YEWTH PARTY.